About WDC

Since 1977, the WDC has worked closely with Mayors and their representatives to influence Congress, policy, and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in directing employment and training funds throughout the country. The WDC works to ensure that workforce development activities are a key focus of cities. The WDC also supports and informs the work of the USCM Committee on Jobs, Education and Workforce.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
WDC Members at the 2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC: From left Michael Gritton, Executive Director, Kentuckiana Works, Robert Sainz, Assistant General Manager, Los Angeles Economic & Workforce Development Department, Keith Lawing, President and CEO, Workforce Alliance of South Central Kansas, Paul Haynes, Executive Director, Middle Tennessee WIB/NCAC, Pamela Moore, President and CEO, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation, Marlena Sessions, CEO, Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County, Rochelle Daniels, General Counsel CareerSource Broward, Danielle Frazier, Interim President and CEO, Charlotte Works and Laurie Larrea, President, Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
2016 USCM 84th Winter Meeting/Jobs, Education and the Workforce Standing Committee Meeting in DC: From left West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Chair; U.S. Department of Education Acting Secretary John King and Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, Vice-Chair.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
2016 WDC Winter Meeting/WDC Leadership Circle Meeting with U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Secretary Perez: From right Mark Edwards, President and CEO, Philadelphia Works, Inc., Laurie Larrea, President, Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas, Portland, OR Mayor Charlie Hales, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, Rick Beasley, Executive Director, CareerSource South Florida, Miami Gardens, FL Mayor Oliver G. Gilbert, III and DOL Secretary Thomas Perez.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
2016 WDC Winter Meeting/WDC Leadership Circle Meeting with U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Perez: From right Rick Beasley, Executive Director, CareerSource South Florida, Miami Gardens, FL Mayor Oliver G. Gilbert, III, DOL Secretary Thomas Perez, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
2016 WDC Winter Meeting/WDC Leadership Circle Meeting with U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Perez: From left DOL Secretary Thomas Perez, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Kansas City, MO Mayor Sly James, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and Pamela Moore, President and CEO, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation.

2016 WDC Winter Meeting in Washington, DC
2016 WDC Winter Meeting WDC Leadership Circle Meeting with U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Perez: From Pamela Moore, President and CEO, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation, Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Steve Partridge, Former CEO, Charlotte Works and Marlena Sessions, CEO, Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County.

2015 April WDC Board Meeting in Miami
WDC Members at the Miami Culinary Institute at Miami Dade College Site Visit.

2015 April WDC Board Meeting in Miami
WDC members.

2015 WDC Annual Congressional Forum
Scott Cheney, Policy Director for Pensions, Workforce and Economic Development Office of Senator Murray and Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee U.S. Senate and Liz Watson, Director of Labor Policy, Education and the Workforce Committee, U.S. House of Representatives

2015 USCM 84th Annual Conference in San Francisco
West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon; DOL Secretary Thomas Perez and Rick Beasley, Executive Director, CareerSource South Florida

2015 USCM 84th Annual Conference in San Francisco
DOL Secretary Thomas Perez at New Door Ventures

2015 USCM 84th Annual Conference in San Francisco
West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon and DOL Secretary Thomas Perez

2015 WDC Annual Conference in San Francisco
Karin Norington-Reaves, CEO, Chicago Cook Workforce Partnership; USCM Staff Joan Crigger and Pamela Moore, President and CEO, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation

2014 WDC Annual Congressional Forum in D.C.
Rick Beasley, Executive Director, CareerSource South Florida; Jennifer Sheehy, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Disability Employment Policy, DOL; Laurie Larrea, President, Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas; Janet LaBreck, Commissioner, Office of the Commissioner, U.S. Department of Education and Andrew McGough, Executive Director, Worksystems, Inc.

2014 WDC Annual Congressional Forum in D.C.
Rick Beasley, Executive Director, CareerSource South Florida; Portia Wu, Assistant Secretary, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor (DOL); Laurie Larrea, President, Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas and Andrew McGough, Executive Director, Workforcesystems, Inc.


Focus / Impact

  • WIOA: The WDC played a central role in
    the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).
  • Policy: The WDC actively works to shape the legislative agenda and national policy.
  • Information: The WDC provides timely information and updates that are critical to our work (i.e.,  weekly emails, member alerts, meetings, and forums).
  • Access: WDC has developed extraordinary relationships with key policy makers and officials (DOL, Congress, and the White House), enabling meaningful dialogue/action.
  • Capacity Building: Through ongoing collaboration and sharing, WDC members are on the cutting edge and develop innovative approaches to workforce challenges.
  • Impact: Comprised of leading workforce professionals from throughout the country, WDC members are
    shaping the future of workforce development.

Members / Benefit

  • WDC members are leading professionals who have the responsibility to build, maintain, and govern urban workforce systems.
  • WDC’s quarterly forums are intimate, allowing for all members to interact with each other and the key officials who address, inform, and learn from the group.
  • A robust committee structure allows for engagement at all levels.
  • The WDC supports the strengthening of the mayoral role in our local workforce system, enabling deeper impact on a local level.
  • For more information on Membership, please contact Kathy Amoroso, kamoroso@usmayors.org, 202-861-6723, or Ida Mukendi, imukendi@usmayors.org, 202-861-6724.

CLICK HERE for more info about the United States Conference of Mayors Workforce and Development Council’s History and Background

What is the WDC?

  • The WDC was established in 1977 by The U.S. Conference of Mayors to call national attention to the problems and potential of urban America in areas related to workforce development.
  • The WDC plays a leading role in all matters of national policy related to workforce development.
  • The WDC supports and informs the work of the USCM Standing Committee on Jobs, Education and Workforce.

What are the primary foci of the WDC?

  • Policy: The WDC actively works to shape the legislative agenda and national policy related to workforce development.
  • Information: The WDC provides timely information critical to doing our work at the local level (weekly emails, member alerts, meetings & forums). 
  • Capacity Building: By connecting with an active network of urban professionals, along with technical assistance and support from WDC staff, members of the WDC are better able to get ahead of the curve and develop innovative approaches to the challenges we face every day in our industry.

What is the WDC’s Competitive Advantage?

  • WDC members are all professionals who have the responsibility to build, maintain, and govern urban workforce systems.
  • WDC’s forums are intimate (approximately 50 to 60 participants), allowing for all members to interact with each other and the high-profile and knowledgeable officials who address the group.
  • WDC is governed by workforce professionals who have the same daily challenges as the membership.
  • An active committee structure allows for engagement at any level.
  • WDC is an arm of The United States Conference of Mayors – The work of the WDC directly supports the maintenance and strengthening of the mayoral role in the workforce system.
  • WDC is affordable and cost-effective.

What Does It Cost?

The Service Fee for annual membership is based on the population of the largest city in the local workforce development area that is a member of The United States Conference of Mayors.  Effective January 1, 2014, the service fee is as follows:

Over 1,000,000                                     $4,950

500,000 – 1,000,000                                 $3,300

200,000 – 500,000                                   $1,650

Under 200,000                                          $825

For those workforce areas who are interested in becoming a member of the WDC and whose city is not a member city, there is an Associate Membership for a Service Fee of $1,100.  This is a non-voting membership which provides all other membership benefits.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Effective July 1, 2017, the new yearly service fee will be as follows:

City Population Membership Fee
under 200,000 $907.50
200,000 – 500,000 $1,815.00
500, 000 – 1,000,000 $3,630.00
Over 1,000,000 $5,445.00
Associate (non-voting) non-Profit member $1,210.00
Associate (non-voting) for-profit member $5,445.00
For more information on how to join, please contact Ida Mukendi, imukendi@usmayors.org or (202) 861-6724.

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