About WDC

Since 1977, the WDC has worked closely with Mayors and their representatives to influence Congress, policy, and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in directing employment and training funds throughout the country. The WDC works to ensure that workforce development activities are a key focus of cities. The WDC also supports and informs the work of the USCM Committee on Jobs, Education and Workforce.

Attending the Mayors and Workforce Board Leadership Meeting in Houston, from left, U.S. Conference of Mayors President and Columbia, SC Mayor Stephen Benjamin; Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren.

Rochelle Daniels, Workforce Development Council Board Member and General Counsel of CareerSource Broward and Pembroke Pines Mayor Frank Ortis at the Mayors and Workforce Board Leaders in Houston.

U.S. Conference of Mayors President and Columbia, SC Mayor Stephen Benjamin opens the Mayors and Workforce Board Leaders Meeting on Local Innovations in Preparing a Highly-Skilled Workforce in Houston in April 2019. From left, Mark Mattke, USCM Workforce Development Council President and CEO of the Spokane Workforce Council; Tom Cochran, CEO and Executive Director of The U.S. Conference of Mayors; and Mayor Stephen Benjamin.

USCM Workforce Development Council (WDC) Leadership at the WDC Board Meeting in Houston. From left, Kathleen Amoroso, USCM Assistant Vice President; Mark Mattke, WDC President and CEO of the Spokane Workforce Council; Trinh Nguyen, WDC First Vice President and Director of the Mayor’s Office Workforce Development in Boston and Pamela Nabors, WDC Second Vice President Pamela Nabors, President and CEO of CareerSource Central Florida.

WDC Board members in a breakout session at the WDC Board Meeting in Houston.

Addressing Mayors and Workforce Development Council Leaders Meeting in Houston from left Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren, Beth A. Van Duyne, Region 6 Administrator of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Nicholas Lalpuis, Regional 6 Administrator of the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor.

Ricardo Neal, Director of Innovation and Strategy at the Literacy Lab in Washington DC, left, and former Workforce Development Council President Clyde McQueen, President and CEO of the Full Employment Council in Kansas City, MO attending the Mayors and Workforce Development Leadership Meeting in Houston.

Molly Conway, Deputy Chief of Staff and Acting Assistant Secretary of the Employment and Training Administration at the U.S. Department of Labor addressing Mayors and Workforce Development Leaders in Houston in April 2019with Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren listening.

Speaking to the Mayors and Workforce Development Leaders in Houston is Andrew Dunckelman, Head of Economic Opportunity at Google.org.

Attending the Mayors and Workf...
Rochelle Daniels, Workforce De...
U.S. Conference of Mayors Pres...
USCM Workforce Development Cou...
WDC Board members in a breakou...
Addressing Mayors and Workforc...
Ricardo Neal, Director of Inno...
Molly Conway, Deputy Chief of ...
Speaking to the Mayors and Wor...

Focus / Impact

  • WIOA: The WDC played a central role in
    the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).
  • Policy: The WDC actively works to shape the legislative agenda and national policy.
  • Information: The WDC provides timely information and updates that are critical to our work (i.e.,  weekly emails, member alerts, meetings, and forums).
  • Access: WDC has developed extraordinary relationships with key policy makers and officials (DOL, Congress, and the White House), enabling meaningful dialogue/action.
  • Capacity Building: Through ongoing collaboration and sharing, WDC members are on the cutting edge and develop innovative approaches to workforce challenges.
  • Impact: Comprised of leading workforce professionals from throughout the country, WDC members are
    shaping the future of workforce development.

Members / Benefits

  • WDC members are leading professionals who have the responsibility to build, maintain, and govern urban workforce systems.
  • WDC’s quarterly forums are intimate, allowing for all members to interact with each other and the key officials who address, inform, and learn from the group.
  • A robust committee structure allows for engagement at all levels.
  • The WDC supports the strengthening of the mayoral role in our local workforce system, enabling deeper impact on a local level.
  • For more information on Membership, please contact Kathy Amoroso, kamoroso@usmayors.org, 202-861-6723, or Ida Mukendi, imukendi@usmayors.org, 202-861-6724.

CLICK HERE for more info about the United States Conference of Mayors Workforce and Development Council’s History and Background.

What is the WDC?

  • The WDC was established in 1977 by The U.S. Conference of Mayors to call national attention to the problems and potential of urban America in areas related to workforce development.
  • The WDC plays a leading role in all matters of national policy related to workforce development.
  • The WDC supports and informs the work of the USCM Standing Committee on Jobs, Education and Workforce.

What are the primary foci of the WDC?

  • Policy: The WDC actively works to shape the legislative agenda and national policy related to workforce development.
  • Information: The WDC provides timely information critical to doing our work at the local level (weekly emails, member alerts, meetings & forums). 
  • Capacity Building: By connecting with an active network of urban professionals, along with technical assistance and support from WDC staff, members of the WDC are better able to get ahead of the curve and develop innovative approaches to the challenges we face every day in our industry.

What is the WDC’s Competitive Advantage?

  • WDC members are all professionals who have the responsibility to build, maintain, and govern urban workforce systems.
  • WDC’s forums are intimate (approximately 50 to 60 participants), allowing for all members to interact with each other and the high-profile and knowledgeable officials who address the group.
  • WDC is governed by workforce professionals who have the same daily challenges as the membership.
  • An active committee structure allows for engagement at any level.
  • WDC is an arm of The United States Conference of Mayors – The work of the WDC directly supports the maintenance and strengthening of the mayoral role in the workforce system.
  • WDC is affordable and cost-effective.

What Does It Cost?

The Service Fee for annual membership is based on the population of the largest city in the local workforce development area that is a member of The United States Conference of Mayors.  Effective July 1, 2017, the service fee is as follows:

City Population Membership Fee
under 200,000 $907.50
200,000 – 500,000 $1,815.00
500, 000 – 1,000,000 $3,630.00
Over 1,000,000 $5,445.00
Associate (non-voting) non-Profit member $1,210.00
Associate (non-voting) for-profit member $5,445.00
For more information on how to join, please contact Ida Mukendi, imukendi@usmayors.org or (202) 861-6724.